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Whew! Not sure I have any fingernails left after this episode. The usual warnings apply: massive spoilers for all episodes of Sherlock season 4. My earlier reviews can be found here in the Sherlock tag.

First, the Doyle story references:

  • The episode title is, of course, taken from the story by the same name, “The Final Problem.” The show has already used that story extensively for inspiration, and the episode draws less from the actual plot this time. However, it does use the element of an explosion at Baker Street. (If you thought the explosion looked fake…well, it wasn’t.)
  • The episode also pulls heavily from “The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual,” in which a nonsense riddle is also a clue to a buried, somewhat grisly mystery. Mycroft calls the Holmes house “Musgrave, the ancestral home,” and in the episode Eurus’ song is called “her little ritual.”
  • Mycroft mentions that he’s seven years older than Sherlock, which is true in the stories as well. (We also learn that Eurus is a year younger than Sherlock.)
  • Mycroft dressing as a sailor is a nod to the several occasions on which Holmes masqueraded as a sailor.
  • We got another reference to Sherlock and John’s danger signal, Vatican Cameos, taken from the “The Hound of the Baskervilles,” in which Holmes says, “I was exceedingly preoccupied by that little affair of the Vatican cameos, and in my anxiety to oblige the Pope I lost touch with several interesting English cases.”
  • Eurus forces Sherlock to solve a mystery in which one of three brothers named Garrideb killed a man named Evans. In “The Adventure of the Three Garridebs,” one of the three men turns out to be Evans, a murderer.
  • Eurus mentions that Moriarty happily agreed to do the recordings for her, and she speculates that he was jealous of his brother, who was a station master. In The Valley of Fear, Holmes says that Moriarty’s brother is “a station master in the west of England.” (Then again, Doyle also says Moriarty has another brother who is a colonel and who inexplicably has the same name, James Moriarty. Doyle never was terribly good with continuity.)
  • Sherlock’s childhood friend Victor Trevor is taken from “The Adventure of the Gloria Scott,” in which Victor Trevor is described as one of Sherlock’s earliest friends from university.
  • Mary’s voiceover at the end paraphrases The Sign of Four: “I am the last and highest court of appeal in detection.” There is a similar quote in “The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual.” She also calls Sherlock and John, “the best and wisest men I have ever known,” taken from Watson’s description of Holmes in “The Final Problem.”
  • The ending montage features several story references, including one of a chalkboard with stick figures, which is from “The Adventure of the Dancing Men,” in which these identical stick-figures are a secret message. And of course, the ending shot with Sherlock and John running out of Rathbone Place was a nod to Basil Rathbone, who played Sherlock Holmes in the 1940s.

Not story references, precisely, but fun little Easter eggs nonetheless:

  • The Wilde quote “The truth is rarely pure and never simple” was intriguing since Wilde and Doyle met at a dinner party in real life and, by some accounts, were friends.
  • Mark Gatiss who plays Mycroft has been dying to use a sword cane for years now, and finally gets his wish in this episode.
  • Hudson was vacuuming to “The Number of the Beast” by Iron Maiden.
  • I searched high and low to see if Uncle Rudy mentioned by Mycroft had a Doyle counterpart. I couldn’t find anything, but if you know what that’s referring to, leave a comment!
  • In the first episode ever of the series, Lestrade says, “Sherlock Holmes is a great man. And one day, if we’re very, very lucky, he might even be a good one.” In this final episode, a police officer mentions to Lestrade that Sherlock is a great man. Lestrade responds, “No, he’s better than that. He’s a good one.” Nice way to bring that full-circle.
  • The fairy tale theme started by Moriarty continued a bit in this episode, with Eurus stating that “good and bad are fairy tales.”
  • The water theme that has been so prevalent was finally explained in this episode as well. Kyle Powers drowned in a pool (Holmes’ first case), the showdown between Sherlock and Moriarty took place at the pool, “The Abominable Bride” featured the fight at Reichenbach Falls, Sherlock fought with AJ in the first episode of this season, and Vivian Norbury kills Mary at the aquarium.

Sherlock fans can be incredibly picky, and it seems every season there’s a large dissatisfied faction, but I thoroughly enjoyed this season. This definitely felt like a wrap-up episode (being the only season finale NOT to end on a cliffhanger), and it’s a good note to end on if they choose to do so. There have been a few rumors of season 5, but it doesn’t sound like that would happen anytime soon. We shall see….

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